Parti Pirate du Canada Législation fondée sur les preuves

Create a Formal Notion of Pseudo-Public Space

There’s very little genuine and accessible public space in Canada; whether you are looking for it online or offline, but there are many places that are private and yet modern life strongly encourages you into, like shopping centres, walkways, parks and open spaces around churches and other buildings.These spaces become so important to people, that it is time to recognizing that citizens have rights in them, despite being private places.

The Pirate Party intends to define a legal notion of “pseudo-public space” which is space that, while privately owned, has become so woven into the lives of citizens, and so essential to their daily routines, that they any rights that they might enjoy in a public place also apply.

The following policies have been approved by the Political Council and will be sent to the membership to be voted on:

-Whether you are looking for open and accessible space in Canada, there are many places that are private and yet modern life strongly encourages you into.  Shopping centres, walkways, parks, congregating and open areas around buildings: these spaces have become so important to people that it is time to recognizing that citizens have rights in them, despite being privately owned.

 

-The Pirate Party intends to define a legal notion of “pseudo-public space” which is space that, while privately owned, has become woven into the lives of citizens and is a regular part of their routines.  The rights that Canadians enjoy in public places should also apply to these pseudo-public places.

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